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LazyLibrarian, Calibre, Calibre-Web, Booksonic Installation Guide v1.0

Here's a guide to help you install a nice library suite on a Linux system. Not in a Docker. Not on Windows. Linux. Plain old Debian Linux. I know some of you want to run it in Docker, or on a Synology, or on Windows. I know nothing about any of that. Sorry. This is a more or less step by step guide to install.
If you follow this, please read through the whole thing first. There are some things that should come in a certain order to make life easier. I've tried to call out options where they are available and give some reasoning behind my choices.
I do NOT have all of the answers. And my choices are not always correct for me, let alone for you.
Hopefully coming soon will be some short guides for things you'll encounter after the installation (why won't my audiobooks import, why aren't calibre entries being written, etc.) As well as an inevitable edit of this guide once all of the flaws and shortcomings have been located.
To get started, you need a Linux installation. I'm assuming a plain vanilla install of Debian that you've booted into once, updated packages, and rebooted if necessary. Not sure if it matters, but I'm running it in a VM. Currently giving the system 4GB of RAM, 4 processors, and 70 GB of space, NOT counting space for the library. The RAM only rarely comes into play. The processors almost never come into play. At some point, I'll dial them both down by half or more. The disc space looks kinda ridiculous. In retrospect, 20-30 is probably more than enough, but I'm still figuring our the room for metadata.
(For comparison, I have 28GB of eBooks at the moment, as well as 164 GB of audiobooks. (Note to self: look into that. Database reporting in LazyLibrarian says I only have 624 books and 263 audio. That amount of disk space seems a bit much. Difference between du and df is interesting.))
Information and items to have before you start (* is mandatory, O is optional):
  • * -Location of helpers like SABNZB, qbittorrent, etc.
  • * -Intended Directory layout. More on this later
  • * -IP address and hostname of your library server (this should be statically set, or you may have issues later) (for this document, we are assuming 192.168.1.100 and hostname librarian)
  • O -Bot accounts on your favorite IRC servers if you like.
  • O -GoodReads account.
  • O -Kindle email to device address

Distribution Choice

I prefer Debian based distros due to simplicity. Usually I go for Ubuntu (because everyone does, it makes it trivial to specific directions). For my library, I went with vanilla Debian. There are some changes in how Ubuntu handles certificates that aren't well documented and that I didn't feel like figuring out. This guide will be based on Debian Buster.
I haven't gotten around yet to playing with Docker. Sometime in the next year, I hope to do that. If you need Docker help, gotta ask someone besides me. This is a guide to putting a library on (virtual) metal.
Required additional packages
  • git (For installing/updating.)
  • xvfb (Required to do a few things with calibre. Most importantly, this is required if you didn't install a gui on your system)
  • python3-pip (Not every python package is prepackaged.)
  • libnss, python3-openssl, python3-oauth (Agh, lost my notes as to why we need this.)
Optional packages
  • openssh-server (unless you are logging in locally or solely through VNC, which I don't recommend.)
  • cifs-utils (if you are using a Samba/SMB share. No, it's not recommended, we're doing it anyway.)
  • imagemagick, ghostscript, python3-pythonmagick, python3-wand (for generating covers and the like)
  • rename (helps manipulate filenames, because ebook and audiobook naming is awful)
  • id3v2 and id3tool (helps manipulate id3 tags because ebook and audiobook tagging is awful. Supposedly id3 v1 is sufficient, but you really need the v2 tool. If you are a super miser on space, skip id3tool)
  • unzip (another file/metadata helper)
Audiobook related packages
  • ffmpeg
To grab all of these:
apt install git xvfb python3-pip libnss python3-openssl python3-oauth openssh-server cifs-utils imagemagick rename id3v2 id3tool unzip ffmpeg
User creation
You need to set up a user just to run the services. On this setup and for this guide, our user is 'librarian'. I shouldn't have, but did set it up as a normal user, but with a couple of adjustments.
adduser librarian --system --group
Your screen should give you something like this:
Adding system user `librarian' (UID 109) ... Adding new group `librarian' (GID 116) ... Adding new user `librarian' (UID 109) with group `librarian' ... 
Take note of the UID and GID numbers. We'll come back to that later.

Directory setup

You will need several directories to exist before you begin the installations.
/home/librarian should already exist. If not, make sure you have a 'librarian' user and group. Then create the directory and assign ownership to your librarian user:
mkdir /home/librarian
chown -R librarian:librarian /home/librarian
If you don't have the usegroup, try creating them again.
Most of the server stuff I want in /srv. If it doesn't exist, /opt is another choice. And back in the day, /uslocal did the trick. This guide uses /srv.
Almost all of my data lies on network mounts. In my case, I use samba/SMB. Unfortunately, calibre does not deal with this very well due to samba/SMB not handling file locks well. So far it's mostly ok if you follow my steps and mounting options. The 'not mostly' part is that every so often you may need to reboot the system.
Filesystems are automounted. You'll have to edit your /etc/fstab file. This is a typical line for my mounts:
//fileserveebooks /mnt/ebooks cifs uid=109,gid=116,credentials=/root/creds,vers=2.1,auto,x-systemd.automount,_netdev,mfsymlinks,nobrl 0 0 
Fileserver is the smb name for the fileserver where the data resides.
/ebooks is the name of the share.
/mnt/ebooks is the location that our librarian system goes to in order to find those files.
cifs merely specifies the kind of fileshare we are using
uid and gid must match the numbers from your 'librarian' user and group. This will make that user and group own the mount and be able to do just about anything with the files.
credentials=/root/creds specifies the location of your smb username and password. You could put the info here, but this provides a little extra security. The /root/creds file should look like this:
Username=BigBadLibrarian Password=s00p3rsekr1+ 
Or whatever your credentials are.
vers=2.1 may be unneccessary or may need changing depending on your client and server to get the compatibility right.
The next two sections make the mount happen automatically at startup, after the network comes up.
The last two sections "mfsymlinks,nobrl" are two options that minimize the locking problem earlier. It's not perfect, but it's the best that can be done.
What directories do you need?
  • /mnt/ebooks/ebooks is where we will put our ebooks (naturally)
  • /mnt/ebooks/audiobooks is for audiobooks
  • /mnt/ebooks/comics is for comics (which are beyond the scope of this document)
  • /mnt/downloads is where our torrent and nzb downloader will place completed downloads. I strongly suggest you place them all here. You can separate them if you wish, but at some point, it's not worth the extra effort of defining things out too finely.
  • /mnt/manual_import is where we will place files that we want to bring in manually. Suppose you copy some files from your ereader or a thumb drive. You drop them into this folder. (In my case, the data is on the file server. I mount it as drive N: on my desktop and as /mnt/manual_import on my librarian. Drop it on the desktop, it appears on the server.)
  • /home/librarian/logs is where we will keep our logs. This isn't the best location (should be /valog/librarian or similar) but this will do for now.
  • /home/librarian/.config/calibre/ is where we will keep some configuration bits, including the user database.

Install calibre-server

Long story short: follow the directions here: https://calibre-ebook.com/download_linux
More info:
A stock install should have the correct tools and dependencies already installed.
Run this on the command line: "sudo -v && wget -nv -O- https://download.calibre-ebook.com/linux-installer.sh | sudo sh /dev/stdin"
This will fetch the calibre installer and run it, placing items in stock locations (/opt/calibre). This is perfectly acceptable.
Now we need a sample file to use to force calibre to create its database. This command will grab the freely available "Hearts of Darkness" from Project Gutenberg. Feel free to grab whatever you like:
sudo wget http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/219.epub.noimages -O heart.epub
Take note of where the file 'heart.pub' is located. I will assume it is in /mnt/manual_import. Whatever directory you choose, life is simpler if you have only one sample epub in there. Next, issue the following command:
sudo xvfb-run calibredb add /mnt/manual_import/* --library-path /mnt/ebooks/ebooks
Change the two directories that start with "/mnt" to your location of heart.epub that you just downloaded and the location where you want your calibre database.
Calibre will run just enough to create a database. The computer should take a few seconds and then come back with "Added book ids: 1". If you look in your library folder, there should be a folder labelled 'Joseph Conrad' (or the author of the book you downloaded) as well as a file named metadata.db.
So now we have our basic database. Some people are leaving us now, as that's a key sticking point. Next step is to verify that the server works. Enter the following command: "sudo calibre-server --port=8180 --enable-local-write /mnt/ebooks/ebooks" Then open up a browser and go to "http://192.168.1.100:8180". You should be able to 'browse' around a bit, seeing your massive one author and single book. That's enough. Go back to the screen where you last were at the command prompt, and press control-c to end the task.
We are going to have some logging in our install. Create the log file and set permissions with these commands: "sudo touch /home/librarian/logs/calibre.log && sudo chown -R librarian:librarian /home/librarian/logs/calibre.log"
We will have separate users for our install. It's not strictly necessary now, but might be down the road.
Create the user database and enter your first user by entering this: "sudo calibre-server --userdb /home/librarian/.config/calibre/server-users.sqlite --manage-users"
Create a library user. We assume username "librarian" and password "password" for this example. Don't type the quotation marks. In addition, give this user rights to all libraries in case you added another. Add another user if you like and provide credentials as well as what library you want that user to have access to.
Next we will need a service file to get calibre-server running at every boot. Using your favorite text editor, edit /etc/systemd/system/calibre-server.service.
Mine looks like this (lines that are comments start with an octothorpe '#'. You can leave them or delete the entire line):
[Unit] Description=calibre content server #this can be anything you want After=remote-fs.target #this prevents calibre from starting until after network shares are mounted. If you are storing everything locally, change remote to local [Service] Type=simple User=librarian Group=librarian #previous two lines should reflect the name of the user and group you set above ExecStart=/usbin/calibre-server \ #this should be your calibre executable. You can display it by typing "which calibre-server" at the command prompt. /mnt/ebooks/ebooks/ \ #your library location --enable-auth \ #if you set up authentication as we did. If you REALLY don't want it, delete previous line or comment it out --userdb="/home/librarian/.config/calibre/server-users.sqlite" \ #location of the database we set above --log="/home/librarian/logs/calibre.log" \ #location of the log file we set above --max-log-size=2 #maximum size of the log in megabytes Restart=on-failure #If it crashes or has certain problems, it will try to restart RestartSec=30 #Tunes restarting of the service [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target #We only want this if we are running services. Not in a single user mode for system. Even if you are the only user, it has nothing to do with this line. Don't touch unless you know what you're doing. 
Reload your services configuration with "systemctl daemon-reload" and attempt to start the server with "systemctl start calibre-server"
Wait 10-30 seconds (it take a bit to get going) and investigate with "systemctl status calibre-server" or "ps ax | grep calibre" or both. The systemctl method is preferred. The beginning of roughly the third line of output should look like:
Active: active (running) 
Stop the service with "systemctl stop calibre-server". Check status. It should no longer say 'Running'. Start the service again. Wait a minute or two. At least as much time as it takes to type the next two commands. Check status. At the end of roughly the third line, there should be a time. It should display a time roughly equal to the last time you issued the command with start. A minute or two.
Now restart the service with "systemctl restart calibre-server" and after no more than about five seconds, issue the status command. The time at the end should be roughly five seconds. If it still says a minute or more, wait 10 seconds and try again. If it still shows an odd time, try the stop command, see if it stops, like it did before. Something isn't right.
And now to make it start on every boot, use the command "systemctl enable calibre-server". You can reboot, wait a minute or so, and then issue the status command to see if it started up ok. (I know there's an easier way than a reboot, but I rarely use it with VMs, so I'm not looking it up now.)
You can go read your copy of Hearts of Darkness (a solid book, btw), take a rest, or forge on.

Install calibre-web (optional but recommended)

This is completely optional but oh so desireable. As good as what calibre does, the author is not as good at UX as he is at other things. The marketplace of ideas stepped in and provided us with calibre-web. It is simply a different front end to calibre. If you like the basic server, you can skip this section.
Download a copy of the software. Currently located at https://github.com/janeczku/calibre-web/archive/master.zip. easiest way is to change to the /srv/ directory and type "wget https://github.com/janeczku/calibre-web/archive/master.zip" and hit enter. Then 'unzip master.zip'. There is now a directory named "calibre-web-master". Change it to "calibre-web" with "mv calibre-web-master calibre-web". Then assign ownership of this folder to your librarian with "chown -R librarian:librarian calibre-web"
Change into that directory. At this point you can largely follow the instructions here, beginning at step 3: https://github.com/janeczku/calibre-web/wiki/How-To:Install-Calibre-web-(-Python3-)-in-Linux-Mint-20---Linux-Mint-19-in-Linux-Mint-20---Linux-Mint-19).
  1. 1Install requirements with "sudo python3 -m pip install --system --target vendor -r requirements.txt"
  2. Run calibre-web with "sudo -u librarian python3 /srv/calibre-web/cps.py"
  3. Leave it running and do not close the terminal.
  4. Go to "http://192.168.1.100:8083" in your browser. You login username is admin and password is admin123
After logging in, you'll be presented with a wizard to help you setup your server. A screenshot of some of that is here: https://github.com/janeczku/calibre-web/wiki
At this point you can setup the startup script or you can keep setting up calibre-web. The startup script will be used even if you have to wipe this out and reinstall what you have so far. OTOH, you won't have to bother with the startup script if you decide you hate the interface and don't want it.
Walk through the setup wizard, filling in as much information as you can. If you collected the right information regarding paths and filenames you should have it all above.
A few suggestions:
  1. Assign at least one other admin user in case you forget the password after changing it from 'admin123'.
  2. Decide which software is going to take 'lead' for importing books, especially manual imports. I chose LazyLibrarian because it pings calibre which backfills calibre-web. The other options would require more manual intervention from time to time. Not to say that this is free of it. Oh no, the metadata is too bad for that to be possible.
  3. If you have a Kindle, set up email to Kindle. You'll need to look up the address on Amazon's site. You'll need an email sender. (I use Google, which will require you to setup an application password. Searching "gmail application specific password" should get you to directions for that.
You should once again have access to your one beautiful copyright free eBook, Hearts of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad.
Next we will need a service file to get calibre-web running at every boot. Using your favorite text editor, edit /etc/systemd/system/calibre-web.service.
Mine looks like this (lines that are comments start with an octothorpe '#'. You can leave them or delete the entire line):
[Unit] Description=Calibre-Web #any descriptive name you like After=remote-fs.target #this prevents calibre from starting until after network shares are mounted. If you are storing everything locally, change remote to local [Service] Type=simple User=librarian Group=librarian #previous two lines should reflect the name of the user and group you set above ExecStart=/usbin/python3 /srv/calibre-web/cps.py #determine the 'python' part by typing "which python3" at the command line. The cps.py part will be in the directory where everything is installed for calibre-web WorkingDirectory=/srv/calibre-web/ #can be changed to /home/librarian/calibre-web after creating the directory, but specifying this one makes installation and cleanup very tidy. [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target #We only want this if we are running services. Not in a single user mode for system. Even if you are the only user, it has nothing to do with this line. Don't touch unless you know what you're doing. 
One other item of note. If you are keeping calibre-web, you should change your /etc/systemd/system/calibre-server.service file. The line saying "After" should be edited to read "After=calibre-web.service remote-fs.target" for network shares or "After=calibre-web.service local-fs.target" for local data. This makes sure that calibre-web starts firsts, calibre-server second. If it happens the other way around, calibre-web will not be able to access the database.
Reload your services configuration with "systemctl daemon-reload" and attempt to start the server with "systemctl start calibre-web"
Wait 10-30 seconds (it take a bit to get going) and investigate with "systemctl status calibre-web" or "ps ax | grep calibre-web" or both. The systemctl method is preferred. The beginning of roughly the third line of output should look like "Active: active (running)".
Stop the service with "systemctl stop calibre-web". Check status. It should no longer say 'Running'. Start the service again. Wait a minute or two. At least as much time as it takes to type the next two commands. Check status. At the end of roughly the third line, there should be a time. It should display a time roughly equal to the last time you issued the command with start. A minute or two.
Now restart the service with "systemctl restart calibre-web" and after no more than about five seconds, issue the status command. The time at the end should be roughly five seconds. If it still says a minute or more, wait 10 seconds and try again. If it still shows an odd time, try the stop command, see if it stops, like it did before. Something isn't right.
And now to make it start on every boot, use the command "systemctl enable calibre-web". You can reboot, wait a minute or so, and then issue the status command to see if it started up ok. (I know there's an easier way than a reboot, but I rarely use it with VMs, so I'm not looking it up now.)
Again, if you prefer the other interface, this one is optional. You can 'uninstall' it at this point by deleting /srv/calibre-web/ and going on about your life.
You can go read your copy of Hearts of Darkness (a solid book, btw), take a rest, or forge on.

Install lazylibrarian

Switch to /srv or wherever you want your installation executables and configs to go. Get the current source by entering the command: "git clone https://gitlab.com/LazyLibrarian/LazyLibrarian.git". This should create a directory named LazyLibrarian in the /srv directory. Start the program by running "python LazyLibrarian.py -d". If it crashes or provides errors, you probably are missing some required libraries. Double check the list above.
Cancel the program with control-c. Set ownership of the directory with "chown -R librarian:librarian /srv/LazyLibrarian". Start the program again, this time by running "sudo -u librarian python LazyLibrarian.py -d". Open a browser window and go to http://192.168.1.100:5299. Cancel the program with control-c. If you saw something, we need to make it start up automatically. If it didn't start or you have errors, now is the time to fix them.
We will need a service file to get lazylibrarian running at every boot. Using your favorite text editor, edit /etc/systemd/system/lazylibrarian.service.
Mine looks like this (lines that are comments start with an octothorpe '#'. You can leave them or delete the entire line):
[Unit] Description=LazyLibrarian After=network.target [Service] ExecStart=/usbin/python3 /srv/LazyLibrarian/LazyLibrarian.py Type=simple User=librarian Group=librarian Restart=on-failure [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target 
Reload your services configuration with "systemctl daemon-reload" and attempt to start the server with "systemctl start lazylibrarian"
Wait 10-30 seconds (it take a bit to get going) and investigate with "systemctl status lazylibrarian" or "ps ax | grep lazylibrarian" or both. The systemctl method is preferred. The beginning of roughly the third line of output should look like "Active: active (running)".
Stop the service with "systemctl stop lazylibrarian". Check status. It should no longer say 'Running'. Start the service again. Wait a minute or two. At least as much time as it takes to type the next two commands. Check status. At the end of roughly the third line, there should be a time. It should display a time roughly equal to the last time you issued the command with start. A minute or two.
Now restart the service with "systemctl restart lazylibrarian" and after no more than about five seconds, issue the status command. The time at the end should be roughly five seconds. If it still says a minute or more, wait 10 seconds and try again. If it still shows an odd time, try the stop command, see if it stops, like it did before. Something isn't right.
And now to make it start on every boot, use the command "systemctl enable lazylibrarian". You can reboot, wait a minute or so, and then issue the status command to see if it started up ok. (I know there's an easier way than a reboot, but I rarely use it with VMs, so I'm not looking it up now.)
Now it's time to configure LazyLibrarian.
Between each tab and subtab on the setup, hit save. It's easy to get lost and forget what you've done, so save often. All that will happen is some errors will get thrown because we won't really have this configured enough to work until 75% done. Similarly, if there's a 'test' button near data you enter, try it. If it throws an error at this stage, it almost certainly won't work for real. Better to fix now than hunt bugs later.
Switch to the config tab in the browser. It's the one with the gear icon. The first subtab is interface. Server details should be blank. Under logs, enter a location for a log file. "/srv/LazyLibrarian/Logs" works well if not already selected. Screenlog should be 500, files set to 10. 99% of people use the bootstrap skin (madeup statistic, but most screenshots online use it.) In the bottom right, untick magazines and comics if you aren't using those features. I'll discuss only ebooks and audiobooks. Most of these settings are personal preference. Set the proxy if your system needs one to reach the internet.
The next subtab is 'Importing'. First column, 'Information Sources'. Easiest source is a GoodReads API key. Go to that site, set it up, and copy the key. (If you don't have one, go to this link https://www.goodreads.com/api/keys provide the required information only, and it will provide the key). Do not enable 'GoodReads Sync' at this time. It's going to require reading and planning. I don't use it because I don't care if GoodReads tracks what I've read. I do care about getting want lists out of GoodReads and we'll do that elsewhere.)
Next is file formats. For each of the three boxes, enter a comma separated list of the file formats you want for a given category. "epub, mobi, pdf" is good for ebooks. The converters and process is most mature. I haven't gotten anything else to work. Maybe some day. Audiobooks works with mp3. I'm trying m4b, but haven't completed my testing with my stack. For now, stick with mp3. Magazines I have no opinion on except that pdfs are common. All of the checkboxes below should be blank for now. After your testing and you are satsified, I suggest adding the checkmarks for the two blacklist options. It will cut down on reloading the same bad files over and over.
Finally, language. Set this for your country. I'm an American English speaker, so I use "en, eng, en-US, en-GB, Unknown". You may not want Unknown unless you are having trouble getting books that should be available in your selected languages. The date display options are personal preference. "$m-$d-$Y" would be typical American date nomenclature. "$Y-$m-$d" probably more popular among Europeans.
Next tab is Downloaders. In this, I'm using SABnzbd+ and qBitTorrent.
For SABnzbd+, setup is straightforward. Enter your SABnzbd+ host's location and port. Credentials for the SABnzbd+ server (not your Usenet provider) and the api key. The API key can be found by clicking the gear icon in SABnzbd+ and then the 'General' tab. Get the api key, not the NZB key. SABnzbd+ should be setup with categories. ebooks should have their own category with a particular location for completed downloads. I have this setup, and the category is 'ebooks' which you enter here. 'Delete from sabnzbd history' is the only ticked box in this column.
For qBitTorrent, setup is pretty similar. Enter your qBitTorrent host's location and port. Enter credentials if needed. Provide category name. The download directory is where the torrent client saves files, but as seen by the lazylibrarian host. If you followed along, this should be '/mnt/downloads'. 'Use Torrent Blackhole' is the only UNticked box in this column.
Providers is the next tab. The content will depend on where you are looking for ebooks.
Priority doesn't have to be set. Use it to favor some providers (they have higher quality books for example) and disfavor others. A provider with a higher score/rating will be used over a lower scored one if the search results are scored at the same value.
Newznab generally provides Usenet searches. Your provider can provide the URL and the key.
Torznab is a way to interface to various torrent search engines using Jackett. Setting that up is beyond the scope of this document. If you've set it up, you should know how to get the data that LazyLibrarian needs here.
RSS/Wishlist feeds are, honestly, an odd little beast. They perform two functions. One is to periodically update a list of torrents available from certain trackers. If you know you need this, enter the rss feed for the url here. Of more interest is the ability to use these as sources for wanted books. If the rss feed is from GoodReads, Amazon, New York Times or Listopia, it will grab that list of books, begin searching, and then download them. I use this for my GoodReads want sync. Find/create a bookshelf on GoodReads. Populate that shelf. Then click on the shelf to show the list. At the bottom of the page, there is a small link labelled 'RSS'. Copy that link. It will be something like: "https://www.goodreads.com/review/list_rss/ANIDENTIFIER?key=AWHOLEBUNCHOFSTUFFTHATCOULDBEUSEDTOIDENTIFYME&shelf=to-read" except the all caps parts will be some identifying code. Paste that link into the RSS URL field in LazyLibrarian. Now, shortly after you add an item to this list in GoodReads, LazyLibrarian will notice and look for the book.
Torrent providers are built in torrent searches. These aren't all always working and or available. Use as needed.
IRC is probably the easiest provider to configure. Most of the time. 'Name' is a simple description. 'Server' is the server hostname, such as 'irc.irchighway.net' or 'irc.undernet.org'. Channel is just that: the name of the channel, including the octothorpe, such as '#ebooks'. The botnick and botpass are fields for servers where you can reserve a bot name. You'll have to look at your irc server and see if this is the case. If so, register the name and password, and enter the credentials here. This isn't universally allowed.
At the bottom of the page is a button marked 'Blocked Providers' There probably are not any right now. As you use LazyLibrarian, if the software encounters issues with a provider, it uses the list here to throttle that connection. If you've fixed something that is paused/throttled/blocked, just come here, open the list, and turn it off. It automatically turns back on if needed.

Install booksonic (optional. Recommended for audiobooks)

Booksonic is a fork of airsonic and runs under java. It serves audiobooks. If not interested, skip it. There are a couple of dependencies, a java runtime and ffmpeg. If installing from scratch, the following command will install them: 'apt install openjdk-8-jre ffmpeg'. There have been a few changes to the development of booksonic since inception. At the time of this writing, download links can be found at: https://booksonic.org/download.
Switch to /srv or wherever you want your installation executables and configs to go. Create a directory named 'booksonic'. Set ownership of the directory with "chown -R librarian:librarian /srv/booksonic". Change into that directory. Download the .war file from the link above. Do not get the 'legacy' link. At the time of this writing, the command to do that is "wget https://github.com/popeen/Booksonic-Aireleases/download/v2009.1.0/booksonic.war" You can quickly test your install by running " java -jar booksonic.war -Dserver.port=4040" and visiting "http://192.168.1.100:4040". If it crashes or provides errors, you probably are missing some required libraries. Double check the list above. If everything looks ok, cancel the program with control-c. delete everything in the /srv/booksonic direct except the .war file. If you accidentally deleted everything, just download a new copy.
Next we will need a service file to get calibre-web running at every boot. Using your favorite text editor, edit /etc/systemd/system/booksonic.service.
Mine looks like this (lines that are comments start with an octothorpe '#'. You can leave them or delete the entire line):
[Unit] Description=Booksonic service [Service] WorkingDirectory=/srv/booksonic ExecStart=/usbin/java -jar /srv/booksonic/booksonic.war #There are a multitude of options here for setting memory usage, ports, etc. Using #this, the url you will visit is http://192.168.1.100:8080. User=librarian Group=librarian Type=simple Restart=on-failure RestartSec=10 [Install] WantedBy=multi-user.target 
Reload your services configuration with "systemctl daemon-reload" and attempt to start the server with "systemctl start booksonic"
Wait 10-30 seconds (it take a bit to get going) and investigate with "systemctl status booksonic" or "ps ax | grep booksonic" or both. The systemctl method is preferred. The beginning of roughly the third line of output should look like "Active: active (running)".
Stop the service with "systemctl stop booksonic". Check status. It should no longer say 'Running'. Start the service again. Wait a minute or two. At least as much time as it takes to type the next two commands. Check status. At the end of roughly the third line, there should be a time. It should display a time roughly equal to the last time you issued the command with start. A minute or two.
Now restart the service with "systemctl restart booksonic" and after no more than about five seconds, issue the status command. The time at the end should be roughly five seconds. If it still says a minute or more, wait 10 seconds and try again. If it still shows an odd time, try the stop command, see if it stops, like it did before. Something isn't right.
And now to make it start on every boot, use the command "systemctl enable booksonic". You can reboot, wait a minute or so, and then issue the status command to see if it started up ok. (I know there's an easier way than a reboot, but I rarely use it with VMs, so I'm not looking it up now.)

Conclusion

Now you should have a working install of calibre, calibre-web, lazylibrarian, and booksonic. Go into booksonic, add an author, and add a book. I've found searching for a book using ISBN is the fastest. When you add that book, if the net gods are smiling on you, your system will locate them, download them, and transfer them to calibre. If you chose an audiobook, the same thing should happen except that your book will be available in booksonic.
You will have to determine the legalities moralities of any of this for yourself and your country.
One problem you will encounter is horrible file naming and metadata. Everyone has their own idea about what cataloguing is best, and the files you download may not work well with the programs we've installed. Honestly, their authors have done fantastic work dealing with a very tricky problem. If you find value in this guide and there is interest, I will try to write some shorter guides about how to deal with metadata and other common problem areas encountered with this tool stack.
submitted by Gmhowell to LazyLibrarian

Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform Instruction Manual for Windows Powershell

Introduction to the manual
This manual is made to guide you step by step in setting up an OpenShift cloud environment on your own device. It will tell you what needs to be done, when it needs to be done, what you will be doing and why you will be doing it, all in one convenient manual that is made for Windows users. Although if you'd want to try it on Linux or MacOS we did add the commands necesary to get the CodeReady Containers to run on your operating system. Be warned however there are some system requirements that are necessary to run the CodeReady Containers that we will be using. These requirements are specified within chapter Minimum system requirements.
This manual is written for everyone with an interest in the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and has at least a basic understanding of the command line within PowerShell on Windows. Even though it is possible to use most of the manual for Linux or MacOS we will focus on how to do this within Windows.
If you follow this manual you will be able to do the following items by yourself:
● Installing the CodeReady Containers
● Updating OpenShift
● Configuring a CodeReady Container
● Configuring the DNS
● Accessing the OpenShift cluster
● Deploying the Mediawiki application
What is the OpenShift Container platform?
Red Hat OpenShift is a cloud development Platform as a Service (PaaS). It enables developers to develop and deploy their applications on a cloud infrastructure. It is based on the Kubernetes platform and is widely used by developers and IT operations worldwide. The OpenShift Container platform makes use of CodeReady Containers. CodeReady Containers are pre-configured containers that can be used for developing and testing purposes. There are also CodeReady Workspaces, these workspaces are used to provide any member of the development or IT team with a consistent, secure, and zero-configuration development environment.
The OpenShift Container Platform is widely used because it helps the programmers and developers make their application faster because of CodeReady Containers and CodeReady Workspaces and it also allows them to test their application in the same environment. One of the advantages provided by OpenShift is the efficient container orchestration. This allows for faster container provisioning, deploying and management. It does this by streamlining and automating the automation process.
What knowledge is required or recommended to proceed with the installation?
To be able to follow this manual some knowledge is mandatory, because most of the commands are done within the Command Line interface it is necessary to know how it works and how you can browse through files/folders. If you either don’t have this basic knowledge or have trouble with the basic Command Line Interface commands from PowerShell, then a cheat sheet might offer some help. We recommend the following cheat sheet for windows:
Https://www.sans.org/security-resources/sec560/windows\_command\_line\_sheet\_v1.pdf
Another option is to read through the operating system’s documentation or introduction guides. Though the documentation can be overwhelming by the sheer amount of commands.
Microsoft: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-serveadministration/windows-commands/windows-commands
MacOS
Https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/mac-terminal-commands-cheat-sheet/
Linux
https://ubuntu.com/tutorials/command-line-for-beginners#2-a-brief-history-lesson https://www.guru99.com/linux-commands-cheat-sheet.html
http://cc.iiti.ac.in/docs/linuxcommands.pdf
Aside from the required knowledge there are also some things that can be helpful to know just to make the use of OpenShift a bit simpler. This consists of some general knowledge on PaaS like Dockers and Kubernetes.
Docker https://www.docker.com/
Kubernetes https://kubernetes.io/

System requirements

Minimum System requirements

The minimum system requirements for the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers has the following minimum hardware:
Hardware requirements
Code Ready Containers requires the following system resources:
● 4 virtual CPU’s
● 9 GB of free random-access memory
● 35 GB of storage space
● Physical CPU with Hyper-V (intel) or SVM mode (AMD) this has to be enabled in the bios
Software requirements
The minimum system requirements for the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers has the following minimum operating system requirements:
Microsoft Windows
On Microsoft Windows, the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers requires the Windows 10 Pro Fall Creators Update (version 1709) or newer. CodeReady Containers does not work on earlier versions or other editions of Microsoft Windows. Microsoft Windows 10 Home Edition is not supported.
macOS
On macOS, the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers requires macOS 10.12 Sierra or newer.
Linux
On Linux, the Red Hat OpenShift CodeReady Containers is only supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux/CentOS 7.5 or newer and on the latest two stable Fedora releases.
When using Red Hat Enterprise Linux, the machine running CodeReady Containers must be registered with the Red Hat Customer Portal.
Ubuntu 18.04 LTS or newer and Debian 10 or newer are not officially supported and may require manual set up of the host machine.

Required additional software packages for Linux

The CodeReady Containers on Linux require the libvirt and Network Manager packages to run. Consult the following table to find the command used to install these packages for your Linux distribution:
Table 1.1 Package installation commands by distribution
Linux Distribution Installation command
Fedora Sudo dnf install NetworkManager
Red Hat Enterprise Linux/CentOS Su -c 'yum install NetworkManager'
Debian/Ubuntu Sudo apt install qemu-kvm libvirt-daemonlibvirt-daemon-system network-manage

Installation

Getting started with the installation

To install CodeReady Containers a few steps must be undertaken. Because an OpenShift account is necessary to use the application this will be the first step. An account can be made on “https://www.openshift.com/”, where you need to press login and after that select the option “Create one now”
After making an account the next step is to download the latest release of CodeReady Containers and the pulled secret on “https://cloud.redhat.com/openshift/install/crc/installer-provisioned”. Make sure to download the version corresponding to your platform and/or operating system. After downloading the right version, the contents have to be extracted from the archive to a location in your $PATH. The pulled secret should be saved because it is needed later.
The command line interface has to be opened before we can continue with the installation. For windows we will use PowerShell. All the commands we use during the installation procedure of this guide are going to be done in this command line interface unless stated otherwise. To be able to run the commands within the command line interface, use the command line interface to go to the location in your $PATH where you extracted the CodeReady zip.
If you have installed an outdated version and you wish to update, then you can delete the existing CodeReady Containers virtual machine with the $crc delete command. After deleting the container, you must replace the old crc binary with a newly downloaded binary of the latest release.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc delete 
When you have done the previous steps please confirm that the correct and up to date crc binary is in use by checking it with the $crc version command, this should provide you with the version that is currently installed.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc version 
To set up the host operating system for the CodeReady Containers virtual machine you have to run the $crc setup command. After running crc setup, crc start will create a minimal OpenShift 4 cluster in the folder where the executable is located.
C:\Users\[username]>crc setup 

Setting up CodeReady Containers

Now we need to set up the new CodeReady Containers release with the $crc setup command. This command will perform the operations necessary to run the CodeReady Containers and create the ~/.crc directory if it did not previously exist. In the process you have to supply your pulled secret, once this process is completed you have to reboot your system. When the system has restarted you can start the new CodeReady Containers virtual machine with the $crc start command. The $crc start command starts the CodeReady virtual machine and OpenShift cluster.
You cannot change the configuration of an existing CodeReady Containers virtual machine. So if you have a CodeReady Containers virtual machine and you want to make configuration changes you need to delete the virtual machine with the $crc delete command and create a new virtual machine and start that one with the configuration changes. Take note that deleting the virtual machine will also delete the data stored in the CodeReady Containers. So, to prevent data loss we recommend you save the data you wish to keep. Also keep in mind that it is not necessary to change the default configuration to start OpenShift.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc setup 
Before starting the machine, you need to keep in mind that it is not possible to make any changes to the virtual machine. For this tutorial however it is not necessary to change the configuration, if you don’t want to make any changes please continue by starting the machine with the crc start command.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc start 
\ it is possible that you will get a Nameserver error later on, if this is the case please start it with* crc start -n 1.1.1.1

Configuration

It is not is not necessary to change the default configuration and continue with this tutorial, this chapter is here for those that wish to do so and know what they are doing. However, for MacOS and Linux it is necessary to change the dns settings.

Configuring the CodeReady Containers

To start the configuration of the CodeReady Containers use the command crc config. This command allows you to configure the crc binary and the CodeReady virtual machine. The command has some requirements before it’s able to configure. This requirement is a subcommand, the available subcommands for this binary and virtual machine are:
get, this command allows you to see the values of a configurable property
set/unset, this command can be used for 2 things. To display the names of, or to set and/or unset values of several options and parameters. These parameters being:
○ Shell options
○ Shell attributes
○ Positional parameters
view, this command starts the configuration in read-only mode.
These commands need to operate on named configurable properties. To list all the available properties, you can run the command $crc config --help.
Throughout this manual we will use the $crc config command a few times to change some properties needed for the configuration.
There is also the possibility to use the crc config command to configure the behavior of the checks that’s done by the $crc start end $crc setup commands. By default, the startup checks will stop with the process if their conditions are not met. To bypass this potential issue, you can set the value of a property that starts with skip-check or warn-check to true to skip the check or warning instead of ending up with an error.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config get C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config set C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config unset C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config view C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config --help 

Configuring the Virtual Machine

You can use the CPUs and memory properties to configure the default number of vCPU’s and amount of memory available for the virtual machine.
To increase the number of vCPU’s available to the virtual machine use the $crc config set CPUs . Keep in mind that the default number for the CPU’s is 4 and the number of vCPU’s you wish to assign must be equal or greater than the default value.
To increase the memory available to the virtual machine, use the $crc config set memory . Keep in mind that the default number for the memory is 9216 Mebibytes and the amount of memory you wish to assign must be equal or greater than the default value.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config set CPUs  C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc config set memory > 

Configuring the DNS

Window / General DNS setup

There are two domain names used by the OpenShift cluster that are managed by the CodeReady Containers, these are:
crc.testing, this is the domain for the core OpenShift services.
apps-crc.testing, this is the domain used for accessing OpenShift applications that are deployed on the cluster.
Configuring the DNS settings in Windows is done by executing the crc setup. This command automatically adjusts the DNS configuration on the system. When executing crc start additional checks to verify the configuration will be executed.

macOS DNS setup

MacOS expects the following DNS configuration for the CodeReady Containers
● The CodeReady Containers creates a file that instructs the macOS to forward all DNS requests for the testing domain to the CodeReady Containers virtual machine. This file is created at /etc/resolvetesting.
● The oc binary requires the following CodeReady Containers entry to function properly, api.crc.testing adds an entry to /etc/hosts pointing at the VM IPaddress.

Linux DNS setup

CodeReady containers expect a slightly different DNS configuration. CodeReady Container expects the NetworkManager to manage networking. On Linux the NetworkManager uses dnsmasq through a configuration file, namely /etc/NetworkManageconf.d/crc-nm-dnsmasq.conf.
To set it up properly the dnsmasq instance has to forward the requests for crc.testing and apps-crc.testing domains to “192.168.130.11”. In the /etc/NetworkManageconf.d/crc-nm-dnsmasq.conf this will look like the following:
● Server=/crc. Testing/192.168.130.11
● Server=/apps-crc. Testing/192.168.130.11

Accessing the Openshift Cluster

Accessing the Openshift web console

To gain access to the OpenShift cluster running in the CodeReady virtual machine you need to make sure that the virtual machine is running before continuing with this chapter. The OpenShift clusters can be accessed through the OpenShift web console or the client binary(oc).
First you need to execute the $crc console command, this command will open your web browser and direct a tab to the web console. After that, you need to select the htpasswd_provider option in the OpenShift web console and log in as a developer user with the output provided by the crc start command.
It is also possible to view the password for kubeadmin and developer users by running the $crc console --credentials command. While you can access the cluster through the kubeadmin and developer users, it should be noted that the kubeadmin user should only be used for administrative tasks such as user management and the developer user for creating projects or OpenShift applications and the deployment of these applications.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc console C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc console --credentials 

Accessing the OpenShift cluster with oc

To gain access to the OpenShift cluster with the use of the oc command you need to complete several steps.
Step 1.
Execute the $crc oc-env command to print the command needed to add the cached oc binary to your PATH:
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc oc-env 
Step 2.
Execute the printed command. The output will look something like the following:
PS C:\Users\OpenShift> crc oc-env $Env:PATH = "CC:\Users\OpenShift\.crc\bin\oc;$Env:PATH" # Run this command to configure your shell: # & crc oc-env | Invoke-Expression 
This means we have to execute* the command that the output gives us, in this case that is:
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc oc-env | Invoke-Expression 
\this has to be executed every time you start; a solution is to move the oc binary to the same path as the crc binary*
To test if this step went correctly execute the following command, if it returns without errors oc is set up properly
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>.\oc 
Step 3
Now you need to login as a developer user, this can be done using the following command:
$oc login -u developer https://api.crc.testing:6443
Keep in mind that the $crc start will provide you with the password that is needed to login with the developer user.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>oc login -u developer https://api.crc.testing:6443 
Step 4
The oc can now be used to interact with your OpenShift cluster. If you for instance want to verify if the OpenShift cluster Operators are available, you can execute the command
$oc get co 
Keep in mind that by default the CodeReady Containers disables the functions provided by the commands $machine-config and $monitoringOperators.
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>oc get co 

Demonstration

Now that you are able to access the cluster, we will take you on a tour through some of the possibilities within OpenShift Container Platform.
We will start by creating a project. Within this project we will import an image, and with this image we are going to build an application. After building the application we will explain how upscaling and downscaling can be used within the created application.
As the next step we will show the user how to make changes in the network route. We also show how monitoring can be used within the platform, however within the current version of CodeReady Containers this has been disabled.
Lastly, we will show the user how to use user management within the platform.

Creating a project

To be able to create a project within the console you have to login on the cluster. If you have not yet done this, this can be done by running the command crc console in the command line and logging in with the login data from before.
When you are logged in as admin, switch to Developer. If you're logged in as a developer, you don't have to switch. Switching between users can be done with the dropdown menu top left.
Now that you are properly logged in press the dropdown menu shown in the image below, from there click on create a project.
https://preview.redd.it/ytax8qocitv51.png?width=658&format=png&auto=webp&s=72d143733f545cf8731a3cca7cafa58c6507ace2
When you press the correct button, the following image will pop up. Here you can give your project a name and description. We chose to name it CodeReady with a displayname CodeReady Container.
https://preview.redd.it/vtaxadwditv51.png?width=594&format=png&auto=webp&s=e3b004bab39fb3b732d96198ed55fdd99259f210

Importing image

The Containers in OpenShift Container Platform are based on OCI or Docker formatted images. An image is a binary that contains everything needed to run a container as well as the metadata of the requirements needed for the container.
Within the OpenShift Container Platform it’s possible to obtain images in a number of ways. There is an integrated Docker registry that offers the possibility to download new images “on the fly”. In addition, OpenShift Container Platform can use third party registries such as:
- Https://hub.docker.com/
- Https://catalog.redhat.com/software/containers/search
Within this manual we are going to import an image from the Red Hat container catalog. In this example we’ll be using MediaWiki.
Search for the application in https://catalog.redhat.com/software/containers/search

https://preview.redd.it/c4mrbs0fitv51.png?width=672&format=png&auto=webp&s=f708f0542b53a9abf779be2d91d89cf09e9d2895
Navigate to “Get this image”
Follow the steps to “create a registry service account”, after that you can copy the YAML.
https://preview.redd.it/b4rrklqfitv51.png?width=1323&format=png&auto=webp&s=7a2eb14a3a1ba273b166e03e1410f06fd9ee1968
After the YAML has been copied we will go to the topology view and click on the YAML button
https://preview.redd.it/k3qzu8dgitv51.png?width=869&format=png&auto=webp&s=b1fefec67703d0a905b00765f0047fe7c6c0735b
Then we have to paste in the YAML, put in the name, namespace and your pull secret name (which you created through your registry account) and click on create.
https://preview.redd.it/iz48kltgitv51.png?width=781&format=png&auto=webp&s=4effc12e07bd294f64a326928804d9a931e4d2bd
Run the import command within powershell
$oc import-image openshift4/mediawiki --from=registry.redhat.io/openshift4/mediawiki --confirm imagestream.image.openshift.io/mediawiki imported 

Creating and managing an application

There are a few ways to create and manage applications. Within this demonstration we’ll show how to create an application from the previously imported image.

Creating the application

To create an image with the previously imported image go back to the console and topology. From here on select container image.
https://preview.redd.it/6506ea4iitv51.png?width=869&format=png&auto=webp&s=c0231d70bb16c76cd131e6b71256e93550cc8b37
For the option image you'll want to select the “image stream tag from internal registry” option. Give the application a name and then create the deployment.
https://preview.redd.it/tk72idniitv51.png?width=813&format=png&auto=webp&s=a4e662cf7b96604d84df9d04ab9b90b5436c803c
If everything went right during the creating process you should see the following, this means that the application is successfully running.
https://preview.redd.it/ovv9l85jitv51.png?width=901&format=png&auto=webp&s=f78f350207add0b8a979b6da931ff29ffa30128c

Scaling the application

In OpenShift there is a feature called autoscaling. There are two types of application scaling, namely vertical scaling, and horizontal scaling. Vertical scaling is adding only more CPU and hard disk and is no longer supported by OpenShift. Horizontal scaling is increasing the number of machines.
One of the ways to scale an application is by increasing the number of pods. This can be done by going to a pod within the view as seen in the previous step. By either pressing the up or down arrow more pods of the same application can be added. This is similar to horizontal scaling and can result in better performance when there are a lot of active users at the same time.
https://preview.redd.it/s6i1vbcrltv51.png?width=602&format=png&auto=webp&s=e62cbeeed116ba8c55704d61a990fc0d8f3cfaa1
In the picture above we see the number of nodes and pods and how many resources those nodes and pods are using. This is something to keep in mind if you want to scale up your application, the more you scale it up, the more resources it will take up.

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Network

Since OpenShift Container platform is built on Kubernetes it might be interesting to know some theory about its networking. Kubernetes, on which the OpenShift Container platform is built, ensures that the Pods within OpenShift can communicate with each other via the network and assigns them their own IP address. This makes all containers within the Pod behave as if they were on the same host. By giving each pod its own IP address, pods can be treated as physical hosts or virtual machines in terms of port mapping, networking, naming, service discovery, load balancing, application configuration and migration. To run multiple services such as front-end and back-end services, OpenShift Container Platform has a built-in DNS.
One of the changes that can be made to the networking of a Pod is the Route. We’ll show you how this can be done in this demonstration.
The Route is not the only thing that can be changed and or configured. Two other options that might be interesting but will not be demonstrated in this manual are:
- Ingress controller, Within OpenShift it is possible to set your own certificate. A user must have a certificate / key pair in PEM-encoded files, with the certificate signed by a trusted authority.
- Network policies, by default all pods in a project are accessible from other pods and network locations. To isolate one or more pods in a project, it is possible to create Network Policy objects in that project to indicate the allowed incoming connections. Project administrators can create and delete Network Policy objects within their own project.
There is a search function within the Container Platform. We’ll use this to search for the network routes and show how to add a new route.
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You can add items that you use a lot to the navigation
https://preview.redd.it/t32sownqitv51.png?width=1598&format=png&auto=webp&s=6aab6f17bc9f871c591173493722eeae585a9232
For this example, we will add Routes to navigation.
https://preview.redd.it/pm3j7ljritv51.png?width=291&format=png&auto=webp&s=bc6fbda061afdd0780bbc72555d809b84a130b5b
Now that we’ve added Routes to the navigation, we can start the creation of the Route by clicking on “Create route”.
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Fill in the name, select the service and the target port from the drop-down menu and click on Create.
https://preview.redd.it/qczgjc2uitv51.png?width=778&format=png&auto=webp&s=563f73f0dc548e3b5b2319ca97339e8f7b06c9d6
As you can see, we’ve successfully added the new route to our application.
https://preview.redd.it/gxfanp2vitv51.png?width=1588&format=png&auto=webp&s=1aae813d7ad0025f91013d884fcf62c5e7d109f1
Storage
OpenShift makes use of Persistent Storage, this type of storage uses persistent volume claims(PVC). PVC’s allow the developer to make persistent volumes without needing any knowledge about the underlying infrastructure.
Within this storage there are a few configuration options:
  • Reclaim
  • Recycle
  • Delete
It is however important to know how to manually reclaim the persistent volumes, since if you delete PV the associated data will not be automatically deleted with it and therefore you cannot reassign the storage to another PV yet.
To manually reclaim the PV, you need to follow the following steps:
Step 1: Delete the PV, this can be done by executing the following command
$oc delete  
Step 2: Now you need to clean up the data on the associated storage asset
Step 3: Now you can delete the associated storage asset or if you with to reuse the same storage asset you can now create a PV with the storage asset definition.
It is also possible to directly change the reclaim policy within OpenShift, to do this you would need to follow the following steps:
Step 1: Get a list of the PVs in your cluster
$oc get pv 
This will give you a list of all the PV’s in your cluster and will display their following attributes: Name, Capacity, Accesmodes, Reclaimpolicy, Statusclaim, Storageclass, Reason and Age.
Step 2: Now choose the PV you wish to change and execute one of the following command’s, depending on your preferred policy:
$oc patch pv  -p '{"spec":{"persistentVolumeReclaimPolicy":"Retain"}}' 
In this example the reclaim policy will be changed to Retain.
$oc patch pv  -p '{"spec":{"persistentVolumeReclaimPolicy":"Recycle"}}' 
In this example the reclaim policy will be changed to Recycle.
$oc patch pv  -p '{"spec":{"persistentVolumeReclaimPolicy":"Delete"}}' 
In this example the reclaim policy will be changed to Delete.

Step 3: After this you can check the PV to verify the change by executing this command again:
$oc get pv 

Monitoring

Within Red Hat OpenShift there is the possibility to monitor the data that has been created by your containers, applications, and pods. To do so, click on the menu option in the top left corner. Check if you are logged in as Developer and click on “Monitoring”. Normally this function is not activated within the CodeReady containers, because it uses a lot of resources (Ram and CPU) to run.
https://preview.redd.it/an0wvn6zitv51.png?width=228&format=png&auto=webp&s=51abf8cc31bd763deb457d49514f99ee81d610ec
Once you have activated “Monitoring” you can change the “Time Range” and “Refresh Interval” in the top right corner of your screen. This will change the monitoring data on your screen.
https://preview.redd.it/e0yvzsh1jtv51.png?width=493&format=png&auto=webp&s=b2c563635cfa60ea7ce2f9c146aa994df6aa1c34
Within this function you can also monitor “Events”. These events are records of important information and are useful for monitoring and troubleshooting within the OpenShift Container Platform.
https://preview.redd.it/l90vkmp3jtv51.png?width=602&format=png&auto=webp&s=4e97f14bedaec7ededcdcda96e7823f77ced24c2

User management

According to the documentation of OpenShift is a user, an entity that interacts with the OpenShift Container Platform API. These can be a developer for developing applications or an administrator for managing the cluster. Users can be assigned to groups, which set the permissions applied to all the group’s members. For example, you can give API access to a group, which gives all members of the group API access.
There are multiple ways to create a user depending on the configured identity provider. The DenyAll identity provider is the default within OpenShift Container Platform. This default denies access for all the usernames and passwords.
First, we’re going to create a new user, the way this is done depends on the identity provider, this depends on the mapping method used as part of the identity provider configuration.
for more information on what mapping methods are and how they function:
https://docs.openshift.com/enterprise/3.1/install_config/configuring_authentication.html
With the default mapping method, the steps will be as following
$oc create user  
Next up, we’ll create an OpenShift Container Platform Identity. Use the name of the identity provider and the name that uniquely represents this identity in the scope of the identity provider:
$oc create identity : 
The is the name of the identity provider in the master configuration. For example, the following commands create an Identity with identity provider ldap_provider and the identity provider username mediawiki_s.
$oc create identity ldap_provider:mediawiki_s 
Create a useidentity mapping for the created user and identity:
$oc create useridentitymapping :  
For example, the following command maps the identity to the user:
$oc create useridentitymapping ldap_provider:mediawiki_s mediawiki 
Now were going to assign a role to this new user, this can be done by executing the following command:
$oc create clusterrolebinding  \ --clusterrole= --user= 
There is a --clusterrole option that can be used to give the user a specific role, like a cluster user with admin privileges. The cluster admin has access to all files and is able to manage the access level of other users.
Below is an example of the admin clusterrole command:
$oc create clusterrolebinding registry-controller \ --clusterrole=cluster-admin --user=admin 

What did you achieve?

If you followed all the steps within this manual you now should have a functioning Mediawiki Application running on your own CodeReady Containers. During the installation of this application on CodeReady Containers you have learned how to do the following things:
● Installing the CodeReady Containers
● Updating OpenShift
● Configuring a CodeReady Container
● Configuring the DNS
● Accessing the OpenShift cluster
● Deploying an application
● Creating new users
With these skills you’ll be able to set up your own Container Platform environment and host applications of your choosing.

Troubleshooting

Nameserver
There is the possibility that your CodeReady container can't connect to the internet due to a Nameserver error. When this is encountered a working fix for us was to stop the machine and then start the CRC machine with the following command:
C:\Users\[username]\$PATH>crc start -n 1.1.1.1 
Hyper-V admin
Should you run into a problem with Hyper-V it might be because your user is not an admin and therefore can’t access the Hyper-V admin user group.
  1. Click Start > Control Panel > Administration Tools > Computer Management. The Computer Management window opens.
  2. Click System Tools > Local Users and Groups > Groups. The list of groups opens.
  3. Double-click the Hyper-V Administrators group. The Hyper-V Administrators Properties window opens.
  4. Click Add. The Select Users or Groups window opens.
  5. In the Enter the object names to select field, enter the user account name to whom you want to assign permissions, and then click OK.
  6. Click Apply, and then click OK.

Terms and definitions

These terms and definitions will be expanded upon, below you can see an example of how this is going to look like together with a few terms that will require definitions.
Kubernetes is an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Openshift is based on Kubernetes.
Clusters are a collection of multiple nodes which communicate with each other to perform a set of operations.
Containers are the basic units of OpenShift applications. These container technologies are lightweight mechanisms for isolating running processes so that they are limited to interacting with only their designated resources.
CodeReady Container is a minimal, preconfigured cluster that is used for development and testing purposes.
CodeReady Workspaces uses Kubernetes and containers to provide any member of the development or IT team with a consistent, secure, and zero-configuration development environment.

Sources

  1. https://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenteen/SSMKFH/com.ibm.apmaas.doc/install/hyperv_config_add_nonadmin_user_hyperv_usergroup.html
  2. https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/openshift_container_platform/4.5/
  3. https://docs.openshift.com/container-platform/3.11/admin_guide/manage_users.html
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